NR-P500 Peco N gauge Somerset Coal Souvenir Wagon Set (2 pack)

NR-P500 Peco N gauge Somerset Coal Souvenir Wagon Set (2 pack)
Product Code: PENR-P500
Availability: 1
Price: £22.50
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Coal was first discovered in Somerset back in 1763 and for the following 210 years the “black diamonds” were brought to the surface at a number of locations around the north of the county, mostly in the Radstock area. By the late 1960s the last operating mines were at Kilmersdon and Writhlington and tonnage peaked at 280,000 tons in 1967. By 1973 the end had come with the very last load of coal brought to the surface, on 28th September. The last trainload of coal left Writhlington Colliery on 16th November 1973. Peco's two models mark the anniversary by replicating the old and the new styles of wagons used during the 20th Century. Writhlington owned around 400 wagons, mostly 5-plank, each distinctively marked with a large capital letter denoting the actual mine they were linked to, “W” obviously representing Writhlington. Other mines were at Foxcote, Kilmersdon and Huish, and carried appropriate capital letters. This model represents one of these 5 plank wagons. The last load of coal was transported in a BR-owned MGR Coal Hopper (number B352251), destined for Portishead Power Station. On one side it carried an inscription hastily added in chalk by the remaining staff, thus bringing to an end over two centuries of coal mining history in Somerset. We have managed to replicate this wagon with the unusual but authentic text on the wagon side, actually printing over the weathered finish of the wagon. The weathering is applied individually by hand. Both wagons are packed together in a smart and attractive presentation set, a suitable souvenir for the N gauge collector or modeller alike.

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